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15 things you might not know about bone loss and osteoporosis

  1. Bone is actually a living, growing organ in the body, which is strong, but flexible.
  2. We constantly lose old bone and form new bone throughout our lives.
  3. Past the mid-life point, bone loss usually starts to become greater than bone formation across the general population, affecting both men and women.
  4. When you lose too much bone, or do not make enough of it, or perhaps a combination of both, this is osteoporosis.
  5. Approximately 3 million people in the UK have suffer from osteoporosis.
  6. Some bone loss can be a result of certain kinds of medication.
  7. Even though bone loss affects both men and women, roughly half of all women and 1 in 4 men over the age of 50 will break a bone as a direct result of osteoporosis.
  8. Women lose up to 20% of their bone density in the five to seven years surrounding the menopause.
  9. By around age 80, Caucasian women have usually lost around one third of their hip bone density.
  10. Broken hips are on the rise, and can be fatal, resulting in 1150 monthly deaths in the UK alone.
  11. If your parents experienced bone breaks in adulthood, your chances of having osteoporosis are greater, as osteoporosis has genetic elements.
  12. The most common osteoporosis breaks happen in the wrist, spine, or hip. A broken bone in the back may cause a sharp pain, but it also may show no symptoms at all.
  13. In those with osteoporosis, breaks can result from even small everyday actions, such as sneezing, lifting, bumping into something, or even hugging someone.
  14. Osteoporosis often shows no symptoms, so many people do not actually know they are affected by it until they break a bone.
  15. Osteoporosis is common, but it is manageable, treatable, and preventable.

Advice on calcium – how much is needed for healthy bones?

Just how much calcium should I be getting? Dr Taher Mahmud of the London Osteoporosis Clinic discusses nutrition, and how calcium intake can help build healthy bones, especially while we are young.

 

Calcium is an essential nutrient. In fact, it is the most abundant mineral in the human body, and plays an important role in its functions. 99% of the calcium in our bodies is found in the teeth and bones, forming an integral part of their structure. In a healthy structure, the body removes small quantities of calcium from the bones and replaces it with new calcium. If the bones receive less calcium than they have taken away, this leads to a deficit and causes bones to become weak, making them more prone to fractures and breaks.

If our diet is calcium-rich, it allows the body to deposit the calcium it gets from food and drink into our bones, meaning our bones stay strong and healthy. When you are younger, building healthy bones is essential, and children and young adults who eat calcium-rich diets can build up stores in their bones, ensuring they have the best start in life.

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We can often think of calcium deposits and our bones like a bank – build up a healthy saving in order to be well-off, and have less risk, later in life. It is also important to note that calcium is just one part in the process of building bones. We can put money into the bank, but we also something to help facilitate that. In the case of the bones, this means other nutrients, like vitamin D, vitamin K, and magnesium.

How much calcium do I need?

The UK government have set recommendations on the level of calcium we should be consuming, which is as follows:

AgeRecommended calcium intake
0-12 months (non-breast fed infants)525mg
1-3 years350mg
4-6 years450mg
11-18 years (boys/girls)1000mg/800mg
19+ years700mg
Pregnant women700mg
Breastfeeding women700mg + 550mg

 

Calcium intake around the age of 11-18 is essential, and should be at its highest level during that period. After 19, the average intake should be around 700mg.

Through famous slogans and campaigns, we all know that milk is a good source of calcium – but is it the only one?

A third of a pint of whole milk contains 224mg of calcium, so that’s four glasses of milk a day for growing girls. But we should be eating a varied diet, and there are many other foods which are calcium-rich, not to mention full of other good nutrients.

Sources of food rich in calcium include:

  • Leafy greens, especially dark ones, such as kale (kale contains 150mg of calcium per 100g), or collards
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Beans/legumes (tofu, black beans, black-eyed peas)
  • Vegetables such as bok choy, broccoli, and cabbage
  • Fish, including sardines, salmon, shrimp, whitebait
  • Wholeweat products

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The benefits and risks of exercise: how exercise affects your body

Just as everyone knows water is wet, the fact that exercise is good for you is common knowledge. However, as with many things in our daily lives, it comes with its own set of risks. In this article Dr Taher Mahmud of the London Osteoporosis Clinic discusses the ways that exercise can help your body, and how you can use it to your advantage rather than putting it under additional strain.

Exercise and common associated risks

The risks related to exercise are much, much fewer than the benefits associated with it. One of the most common occurrences is a musculoskeletal injury. These include strains, tears, stress fractures, traumatic fractures, and inflammation. Whilst injuries like this are relatively common, they are also less serious and the body can usually recover, particularly with the correct course of treatment. Some ways to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal injury include:

  • Regularly exercising so your body gets in the habit
  • Warming up before exercising, and stretching correctly after the exercise session is over
  • Knowing your limits, and participating in activities which are right for your body and its capabilities
  • Improving muscle strength and balance

Exercise and more serious risk

Some of the more serious risks surrounding exercise relate to cardiac problems, particularly in those who have a past history of heart problems. Arrhythmia, which refers to an irregular heartbeat, carries an increased risk during exercise. In those with heart problems, regular check-ups with a doctor are advised, but studies show that exercise training may reduce arrhythmia risk.

Habitual physical activity can help to lower the risk of cardiac problems, even in the case of rarer heart conditions such as sudden cardiac death. In those who have a history of heart problems, exercise programs should be planned and tailored to the individual. There are a number of ways to approach exercise, including endurance training, interval training, and resistance training.

In those with asthma or other respiratory conditions, care should be taken to avoid bronchoconstriction, a narrowing of the airways in the lungs. Many with these conditions can reduce the risk by altering their training techniques and taking certain medications.

Many of the risks associated with exercise are related to pre-existing conditions, or the incorrect management of medical conditions. With the correct approach to exercise, and where appropriate, medical advice and monitoring, risks can be greatly reduced and should be no reason to avoid regular exercise. If in doubt it is best to seek help from a exercise professional; at the London Osteoporosis Clinic we published some exercise videos to help with correct technique, and give our patients further support.

For many people, exercise is a way of life – not to be missed, and not to be taken lightly. While of course there is such a thing as overdoing it, the benefits exercise brings us are not to be avoided. It should be a part of everyday life, both for the here and now and to help reduce the risk of certain conditions developing in the future. In our last interview with Dr Taher Mahmud of the London Osteoporosis Clinic, we discussed the risks exercise can carry. Now it’s time to move on to the benefits. How can exercise improve our lives?

Our first point should definitely be enough to convince you – exercise helps you live longer. Studies of elite athletes have shown that they have 67% lower mortality compared with the general public. Even by finding the time to walk an extra ten minutes a day can help you improve your lifespan – almost by an extra two years. The more exercise you do, the larger this figure becomes.

Other benefits gained from exercise:

  • Cardiac benefits – habitual exercise can reduce the risk of coronary disease, cardiovascular death, and other cardiac conditions, even in the case of secondary prevention (after already experiencing complications of a heart condition)
  • Weight benefits – exercise to prevent or treat obesity is incredibly effective, and can contribute to a great loss in body fat, compared to simply following a weight loss diet alone.
  • Cancer prevention and treatment – there is evidence to suggest that exercise may provide some protection against certain types of cancer, including breast, prostate, endometrial, intestinal, colon, and pancreatic cancer. For example, in women, oestrogen is thought to encourage development of breast cancer. Exercise helps to reduce levels of oestrogen, and therefore may help to reduce the risk.
  • Osteoporosis prevention – weightbearing exercise is proven to increase our levels of bone density, building up bone in order to help protect from weakening and fractures later on in life. Even in those with osteoporosis, exercise can help reduce the risk of fracture, when tailored to the patient and their needs.
  • Mental health – our levels of stress, anxiety and even depression can be affected by regular exercise. In those who suffer from depression, exercise is recommended as a positive influence and can help to improve self-esteem.
  • Cognitive health – it is thought that exercise may help to reduce the risk of dementia and other cognitive decline, particularly in older patients. Exercise is directly linked to improved cognitive function. Even in those with dementia, exercise and being active is important, as it has a direct impact on their wellbeing and can significantly improve their quality of life.

It’s not just serious conditions – exercise can help even in small ways, such as through boosting our energy levels, improving our quality of sleep, building muscle tone, lowering blood pressure, and feeling fitter and healthier.

There are many different ways to exercise, and whether it is to help with an existing condition, or as a preventative measure, it should be a part of our everyday lives. The good points of exercise far outweigh the risks – everyone can benefit from being physically active.

Breast, Bone and Head pains

Breast, Bone and Head pains, can be first signs of the menopauseFluctuating hormones are thought to be the reason behind many conditions and symptoms relating to the menopause.

Breast pain

Breast pain and tenderness are common in the early menopausal transition, but begin to diminish in the late menopausal transition. This is probably due to the fluctuations in oestradiol (the primary female sex hormone) concentrations.

 

The menopause and bone loss

As we get older, generally the level of bone we have in our bodies decreases – we usually reach our peak bone mass in our thirties, after which the bone resorption rate begins to overtake the rate our bodies produce new bone. In the perimenopause (the menopausal transition) women can lose up to 5% of bone per year, and over a 4-5 year period they can lose up to 20-25% of their bone mass.

Menopause and the joints

At the midlife stage, women may experience joint aches and pain, with a reported prevalence as high as 50 to 60 percent, according to cross-sectional studies. As women enter the menopause, they can experience inflammation in the joints, pain, and a loss in range of movement due to joint stiffness.

Joint pain is relatively common in women approaching the menopause. It can affect any joint in the body, and be limiting, as it can make day-to-day tasks more difficult or unpleasant to perform.

Menopausal migraine

Menstrual migraines are migraine headaches that cluster around the onset of each menstrual period. In many women, these headaches worsen in frequency and intensity during the menopausal transition.

 

Treatment and diagnosis of bone and joint problems

Nowadays, there are tests that can be done to check a woman’s vitamin D (and other nutrient) levels, bone strength, and if the joint pain they are experiencing is related to arthritis. Blood tests, for example, can be taken to diagnose arthritis. These tests are easily performed and can give indication of general bone and joint health.

There are various ways to deal with the treatment of bone conditions or arthritis/inflammation in the joints. Many start with lifestyle changes, including optimal nutrition and encouraging regular exercise. A lack of exercise accelerates bone loss, along with other factors such as drinking excess alcohol and smoking.

The course of treatment for each patient is different, but there are certain types of medication or drug available which can help to reduce the symptoms of arthritis or other inflammatory conditions.

If symptoms are troublesome, do not suffer in silence, and imagine they are normal. There are treatments and solutions available for both bone and joint pain. The earlier you seek help, the more chance you have of reducing or eradicating your symptoms.

Osteoporosis: what is the big deal and why the need for action?

Osteoporosis is common, affecting hundreds of thousands of people in the UK. Every year, there are over 500,000 osteoporosis-related fractures, and every month, 1,100 deaths occur following a hip fracture. The impact of osteoporosis can be devastating, but it is treatable, and preventable.

What do you know about osteoporosis?

In the UK alone, 1 in 2 women, and 1 in 5 men over the age of 50 will have osteoporosis.  Every three minutes, because of osteoporosis, someone experiences a fracture.  An estimated 3 million people in the UK suffer from osteoporosis. Each year, thousands of patients experience wrist, hip, or spinal fractures – and the numbers are on the rise

 

What actually is osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis happens when bones become gradually more fragile.  This can progress painlessly, until a bone suddenly breaks. Our bones are made of a thick outer shell, which surrounds a strong mesh network filled with calcium salts, collagen (protein), and other important minerals. When the mesh becomes thin, it can break easily. In the body, bones are constantly in a state of renewal. Old bone breaks down, and new bone is made. This happens more slowly in old age. In young people, the body makes new bone faster than it breaks down the old bone, so bone mass is increased. Over time, this process slows down. We reach our peak bone mass level in our early 30s, and from them, bones break down faster than the body is able to create them. Therefore, the more you produce bone and accumulate bone mass in your younger years, the less likely you are to develop osteoporosis as you age. Think of your body like a bank, saving bone for later in life.

 

What causes osteoporosis?

As well as a low peak bone mass, there are other factors that can contribute to the development of osteoporosis:

A sedentary lifestyle (e.g lack of exercise, not being active) ·

Drinking excess alcohol

Smoking

Low sun exposure and lack of vitamin D

Low calcium levels

Inflammatory conditions (e.g arthritis)

Genetic variation

Drugs, such as steroids

Apoptosis (cell death)

Menopause – particularly early menopause

Osteoporosis is also more common in women than it is in men. The most commonly affected areas in the body are the wrist, hip, and spine. As the process is gradual, osteoporosis often displays no symptoms until a bone breaks. However, as bones become weaker, you may notice back pain, a slight loss in height over time, or a stooped posture.

 

Treatment and prevention of osteoporosis

There are ways you can help to reduce your risk of developing osteoporosis, and many start with your lifestyle.  Smoking is advised against, as it can increase rates of bone loss, and reduce levels of calcium absorption.  If you drink excess alcohol, this can decrease your bone formation and decrease the body’s ability to absorb calcium.

Moderation is key, and more than one alcoholic drink a day is considered excessive. Alcohol can also increase your risk of falling, which is another risk factor for osteoporosis.

To prevent falls, wearing shoes with a low heel is recommended, along with making sure your general environment is as safe as possible. Tuck away wires or cables, and avoid having slippery surfaces around the home.

Once osteoporosis has been diagnosed, there are various medications and therapies that can be prescribed by the doctor. After diagnosis, your specialist can recommend the best course of treatment.

Prevention, however, is always better than cure in this case. Your lifestyle and the decisions you make can affect your bones and their health. Factors such as nutrition, exercise, and daily habits can affect how likely you are to develop the condition. While osteoporosis is common, it can be helped, and you have the potential to prevent it.

Should arthritis be considered a medical emergency?

Arthritis conditions have a serious impact on both individual health and the healthcare system across the UK. Around 10 million people over the UK suffer from some form of arthritis*, the most common forms being osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Over 30% of GP consultations are related to a musculoskeletal condition.

Health and safety executive reports state that work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMSKDs) in Great Britain remain an ill health related condition that places significant burdens on employers and employees accounting for 41% of all work related ill health. With approximately 15% of the population affected, arthritis is a real problem needing to be tackled, treated, and prevented. Dr Taher Mahmud of the London Osteoporosis Clinic discusses why he believes arthritis should be treated as a medical emergency.

The impact of early arthritis symptoms

Most people think arthritis is inevitable, and many assign themselves to the fact that they will develop it at some point in their lives – especially if other family members have the condition. Early symptoms can often be ignored, or pushed aside, meaning the progression of arthritis is not slowed, and damage is done to the muscle and bone.

At the London Osteoporosis Clinic, we believe that arthritis should be taken incredibly seriously in its early stages, and in fact treated as a medical emergency, simply because of how much the early treatment of arthritis symptoms has impact on the lives of those with the condition.

Early symptoms may not be particularly grave in themselves, but they can lead to changes in bone and muscle, which means the patient experiences a reduction, perhaps even without thinking, in daily activities, energy, and general vitality. This greatly impacts the sufferer’s life, as they over time will not be as productive, and irreversible damage can be done to the bones and joints; as well as impacting negatively on work and home activities.

Treatment of early arthritis symptoms

Evidence supports that if spotted early, treatment for arthritis and rheumatic conditions is more effective. Symptoms and conditions are more likely to go into remission, and the joint and muscles are less likely to be permanently damaged, which means disability and surgery can be avoided.

The approach involves nutrition, exercise and where necessary drugs, injection(s), and aggressive treatment, can reduce the rate of progression of the condition, or even put it into remission. Many patients are reluctant to take drugs and medication, but in the case of arthritis, prevention is better than allowing disability and loss of function to accumulate, considering the impact these have on work and home life. With early treatment damage can be avoided and the individual is more likely to achieve remission with drugs, or even drug-free remission.

Watch for the symptoms of arthritis – know what to be aware of

Early symptoms of arthritis include:

· Fatigue with no obvious cause

· Pain and stiffness in joints

· Minor joint swelling, which may not be permanent, but rather flare up on occasion

· Low-grade fever (fever above 38° is usually associated with infection or another form of illness)

· The inability to bend or straighten certain joints

· Tingling sensations, or numbness in the joints and tendons

· General weakness

· Difficulty sleeping

· A loss in appetite, and/or weight loss

· A dry mouth, or dry itchy eyes

Most will display a variety of symptoms. Many who experience these symptoms do not talk to their doctor as they think nothing can be done – but the earlier you catch arthritis, the better. Joint and bone health is an important part of our lives, and it can seriously affect you when it comes to future health issues. If in doubt, check the symptoms out – help and support is always there.

*http://www.arthritisresearchuk.org/arthritis-information/data-and-statistics.aspx

Arthritis, menopause and hormonal changes

There are 3.5 billion women on the planet (almost) all of whom will go through the menopause at some stage in their life.  In the UK The average age of menopause is 51 years old.  A woman officially reaches the menopause when she has gone through 12 consecutive months without a period.  The time leading up to this is called the perimenopause.   During this transitional time, the levels of the hormones estrogen and progesterone fluctuate, giving rise to the symptoms of menopause that we are all more commonly aware of, irregular periods, hot flushes, night sweats and effect on mood.

Estrogen receptors are also found in the synovium of joints. It is this decline in estrogen in the run up to menopause that can give rise to joint pains and stiffness.

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in men and women.  It is usually related to wear and tear of our joints and ageing.  It is more prevalent in women than men and increases in incidence from 50 years of age.

You can see that a woman heading into the menopause is therefore also on a fast track course to getting symptoms of arthritis. Often a woman in her mid 40’s will say that her joints feel stiff in the mornings and it takes about half an hour to loosen up.

In fact 25% of women over the age of 45 years will present to their GP with joint pains, usually in their neck, knees and hands and 50% of women over the age of 50 years will present with joint symptoms and associated menopause symptoms. Often some of these symptoms are self limiting and resolve within 2-5 years ie coinciding with their menopause symptoms.

It has been shown in trials that hormone replacement therapy can alleviate these symptoms so there is a clear link between arthritis around the menopause and oestrogen deprivation.

In summary, joint pain and stiffness in the menopause transition is a common problem and related to oestrogen fluctuation and decline.  It can also be the early signs of inflammatory arthritis, endocrine issues and malignancy so it’s important to exclude these before considering hormone replacement therapy appropriate to the individual.  If in doubt please see your doctor or rheumatologist.

References

Menopause and HRT are important aetiological factors in Hand Osteoarthritis, Results from a cross sectional study in secondary care, Professor Fiona Watt, Kennedy Instituteof Rheumatology, University of Oxford, UK

Menopause Arthralgia, Fact or Fiction , Maglorzata Magliano, Maturitas 2010

The importance of vitamin D and your bones

You’ve likely heard of vitamin D, in some way or another. Maybe you’ve eyed it on your smoothie bottle, or pondered what it was doing in your moisturiser, but never really known exactly why we need it, and what role it performs in our bodies. Dr Taher Mahmud of the London Osteoporosis Clinic gives us the basics of vitamin D, and why it’s necessary for us and our bone health.

What is vitamin D?

Vitamin D is sometimes nicknamed ‘the sunshine vitamin’, as our skin produces it naturally in a direct response to sunlight. Vitamin D can be made by the skin, but only in temperate climates. The UK winters don’t exactly stimulate the process – although (at times) the weather is sunny, there is not enough UVB light, essential in vitamin D production in the body. So even if you’re outside in winter, your body cannot produce the vitamin D it needs.

The vitamin is fat-soluble, meaning it dissolves in fat and is stored throughout the body. Fat soluble vitamins, like vitamin A, D, E and K, are absorbed into the body through the lymphatic system, then finally into the blood circulation, where they are beneficial in different ways.

Vitamin D has several important functions, but one of the most important is regulating the body’s absorption of calcium. You can be taking in enough calcium through your diet, but all this will be wasted if you aren’t getting the right amount of vitamin D. Calcium can only help to build bones at full potential if the body has enough vitamin D. Lack of vitamin D results in a vitamin D deficiency – a problem in the UK, as the weather prevents a high amount of the population from getting the vitamin D they need.

What are the symptoms of a vitamin D deficiency?

In adults, symptoms may manifest in the following ways:

  • Through tiredness, feeling aches and pains, and generally feeling lethargic or unwell
  • Bone pain
  • Muscle weakness
  • Excessive sweating

In children, as bones are forming and developing, vitamin D deficiency may lead to ‘softer’ bones, resulting in conditions like rickets, or skeletal deformities such as knock knees and bow legs. Low vitamin D can also cause low calcium levels, which can cause muscle cramps and seizures in the very young.

What problems can vitamin D deficiency cause in adults?

Low levels of vitamin D are linked to bone conditions such as osteomalacia, where bones become soft or weak due to loss of calcium and other minerals, and osteoporosis, where bone density decreases, bones become more porous, and break due to weakness over time.

How can we increase vitamin D intake?

Vitamin D levels can be checked through a blood test, and there are ways other than being exposed to sunlight to make sure that you get the right amount.

Some foods and drinks are fortified with vitamin D, especially in countries in the northern hemisphere. Cereals, margarine, and some dairy products such as milk may have vitamin D added to them. There are also foods in which vitamin D naturally occurs, such as egg yolks and fatty/oily fish.

However, it is difficult for children, and sometimes adults, to get the right amount of vitamin D through food alone. There are many multi-vitamin supplements on the market that can help increase vitamin D levels, and calcium supplements may also contain vitamin D.

Those with low vitamin D also require more calcium in their diet. Calcium-rich foods include dairy products such as yoghurt, milk, and cheese, or tofu, which can be important for those who avoid dairy products.

It is also important to stress that while sunlight exposure plays a key role in vitamin D production, you shouldn’t be reaching for your beach towel and deck chair with abandon. Ten minutes exposure is usually enough, as any more can cause reddening and burning. Too much sun exposure is linked to skin cancer, so as with most things in life, getting the balance right is essential.

Getting enough calcium and vitamin D is an essential part of prevention of osteoporosis and other related conditions. Talk to your doctor or contact the London Osteoporosis clinic about the best ways to include these nutrients in your diet, and daily routine.

Osteoporosis – what is the big deal and why the need for action

Osteoporosis is common, affecting hundreds of thousands of people in the UK. Every year, there are over 500,000 osteoporosis-related fractures, and every month, 1,100 deaths occur following a hip fracture. The impact of osteoporosis can be devastating, but it is treatable, and preventable.

What do you know about osteoporosis?

  • In the UK alone, 1 in 2 women, and 1 in 5 men over the age of 50 will have osteoporosis.
  • Every three minutes, because of osteoporosis, someone experiences a fracture.
  • An estimated 3 million people in the UK suffer from osteoporosis
  • Each year, thousands of patients experience wrist, hip, or spinal fractures – and the numbers are on the rise

What actually is osteoporosis?

Osteoporosis happens when bones become gradually more fragile. This can progress painlessly, until a bone suddenly breaks. Our bones are made of a thick outer shell, which surrounds a strong mesh network filled with calcium salts, collagen (protein), and other important minerals. When the mesh becomes thin, it can break easily.

In the body, bones are constantly in a state of renewal. Old bone breaks down, and new bone is made. This happens more slowly in old age. In young people, the body makes new bone faster than it breaks down the old bone, so bone mass is increased.

Over time, this process slows down. We reach our peak bone mass level in our early 30s, and from them, bones break down faster than the body is able to create them.

Therefore, the more you produce bone and accumulate bone mass in your younger years, the less likely you are to develop osteoporosis as you age. Think of your body like a bank, saving bone for later in life.

What causes osteoporosis?

As well as a low peak bone mass, there are other factors that can contribute to the development of osteoporosis:

  • A sedentary lifestyle (e.g lack of exercise, not being active)
  • Drinking excess alcohol
  • Smoking
  • Low sun exposure and lack of vitamin D
  • Low calcium levels
  • Inflammatory conditions (e.g arthritis)
  • Genetic variation
  • Drugs, such as steroids
  • Apoptosis (cell death)
  • Menopause – particularly early menopause

Osteoporosis is also more common in women than it is in men. The most commonly affected areas in the body are the wrist, hip, and spine.

As the process is gradual, osteoporosis often displays no symptoms until a bone breaks. However, as bones become weaker, you may notice back pain, a slight loss in height over time, or a stooped posture.

Treatment and prevention of osteoporosis

There are ways you can help to reduce your risk of developing osteoporosis, and many start with your lifestyle.

Smoking is advised against, as it can increase rates of bone loss, and reduce levels of calcium absorption.

If you drink excess alcohol, this can decrease your bone formation and decrease the body’s ability to absorb calcium. Moderation is key, and more than one alcoholic drink a day is considered excessive. Alcohol can also increase your risk of falling, which is another risk factor for osteoporosis.

To prevent falls, wearing shoes with a low heel is recommended, along with making sure your general environment is as safe as possible. Tuck away wires or cables, and avoid having slippery surfaces around the home.

Once osteoporosis has been diagnosed, there are various medications and therapies that can be prescribed by the doctor. After diagnosis, your specialist can recommend the best course of treatment.

Prevention, however, is always better than cure in this case. Your lifestyle and the decisions you make can affect your bones and their health. Factors such as nutrition, exercise, and daily habits can affect how likely you are to develop the condition. While osteoporosis is common, it can be helped, and you have the potential to prevent it.

Strontium ranelate (Protelos) to be discontinued

Osteoporosis drug strontium ranelate (Protelos) will not be available after August

Servier, the manufacturer of strontium ranelate will no longer offer the drug to the UK after August. This is because the drug has limited uses and relatively few patients are on the drug.

 

Protelos was licensed in the UK for treatment of severe osteoporosis in postmenopausal women and adult men at high risk of fracture.

 

MHRA raised safety concerns about the drug connected to cardiovascular risks which have led to its limited use and gradual decrease in those being treated with it.

https://www.gov.uk/drug-safety-update/strontium-ranelate-cardiovascular-risk

 

In recent times Strontium has been generally prescribed in secondary care. And we found the drug to be very useful in young patients.

 

Strontium ranelate supply will cease worldwide from August 2017.

 

Dr Mahmud and team at London Osteoporosis Clinic recommend patients to see their GP for a review of treatment options.  Alternative pharmaceutical options are https://www.londonosteoporosisclinic.com/drug-info/.

 

Osteoporosis is a serious progressive bone condition leading to bone fractures, disability and early death.  Only 2 in 10 patients are appropriately assessed following an osteoporosis fracture and treatment in many can be suboptimal.

There is more information about osteoporosis, diagnosis and treatment as well as prevention at https://www.londonosteoporosisclinic.com/what-is-osteoporosis/